The Best Chocolate Chip Bars with Almond Pulp

I recently posted a video and recipe making homemade almond milk. Here’s the link. And, follow me on Instagram! 🥰

Here’s what I made with the leftover almond pulp…YUM! Healthy CAN be tasty!! I love that there was no waste after making my almond milk!! These gluten-free bars passed the adult and kiddo taste test!! This recipe is vegan and dairy-free.

Note: Because I personally used a mix of mini vegan dark chocolate chips, and melted regular semi-sweet chocolate chips on top, my version is not technically vegan because of the butter in the chocolate chips. The chocolate topping is optional but, I also found that adding a thick smear of melted chocolate helped keep these bars intact and offered a pleasant crunch/snap. Slice your bars first THEN slather or drizzle with chocolate.

Below is the ingredient list and partial recipe. Click here to view the additional notes and full recipe.

The most delicious Chocolate Chip Granola Bars made from leftover almond pulp! Or you can just use blanched almond flour if you prefer. These are full of flavor, are vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free and oil-free and only 8 ingredients! SO much better than store-bought!

Prep Time: 20 mins

Cook Time: 30 mins

Total Time: 50 mins

Servings: 8 bars Author: Brandi Doming

Ingredients

• 1 cup (107g) almond pulp or 1 cup (112g) blanched almond flour

• 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons( 200g) pure maple syrup, room temperature (or agave)

• 1/4 cup (32g) ground flaxseed

• 1 cup (100g) gluten-free whole rolled oats, NOT quick oats

• 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

• 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

• 1/2 cup (120g) mini dairy-free chocolate chips (I use Enjoy Life)

• 1/2 cup (128g) creamy roasted almond butter

• 2 teaspoons (10g) vanilla extract

Instructions

• Before following the recipe, if you are using homemade almond pulp, make sure you have squeezed out the excess moisture out really well, from preparing the almond milk. Papertowel dry it and store in the fridge overnight, as this helps to dry it out some. You do not need a dehydrator or to bake it to dry it out, but you also don’t want it too wet or to use it immediately after making your almond milk, because it could make the bars too wet.

• Preheat an oven to 350 degrees and line a 9X5 loaf pan with parchment paper hanging over the sides for easy removal later. Do you use a different size or bigger pan, otherwise the bars will be too thin and not bind well or hold their shape. They are meant to be thick bars like in the photos.

• Mix the syrup and flaxseed in a cup well with a fork and set aside for 10 minutes to gel up. Do not skip this step, as it is what acts as the “egg” and binds the bars to hold their shape.

• In a large bowl, combine the almond pulp (or almond flour), oats, cinnamon and salt and whisk well. Stir in the chocolate chips. I prefer mini because they disburse well and stay in tact better.

• After the 10 minutes is up for the syrup and flaxseed mixture, stir in the almond butter and vanilla until very smooth. Pour over the dry ingredients and stir for a couple of minutes until very sticky and absorbed, pressing with the back of your spoon to help mix.

• Add the dough to the loaf pan and spread out evenly and flat with a rubber spatula. You can slightly dampen your fingers to help press it down around the edges, as it will be sticky.

• For dough using almond pulp, bake for 30-32 minutes until very golden brown and firm on top. For dough using almond flour, bake about 27-30 minutes until very golden brown and firm on top.

Important

• Cool 1 hour before cutting, or they will fall apart. They firm up a lot as they cool. If desired, melt some chocolate chips and drizzle the tops for added sweetness or for presentation purposes. Honestly, they are plenty delicious without it, I just did it more for looks. Slice very carefully into 8 bars. Wrap each individually in plastic wrap and store in the fridge. They will hold their shape very well this way and it makes for an easy grab-and-go snack!

Free zoom classes this week: Baptiste Power Vinyasa and Deep Flow.

It’s Day 35/40 of following “40 Days to Personal Revolution” by Baron Baptiste! This week’s theme is TRIUMPH and for our final week we are requested to practice 90 minutes a day.

SCHEDULE CHANGE 5-630pm:

For this week my Monday Feb 15th Baptiste Power Vinyasa and Wednesday Feb 17th Deep Flow zoom classes will move to 5pm and will be 90 minutes long. Book your spot here.

After you register you will receive a zoom link 15 minutes before class.

To receive notifications about my virtual zoom and outdoor classes (soon to resume) follow me here: https://app.ubindi.com/Amelia.Andaleon

“The Hill We Climb” – Inauguration poem by Amanda Gorman

Listen to Amanda Gorman’s full Inauguration poem.

When day comes we ask ourselves, where can we find light in this never-ending shade? The loss we carry, a sea we must wade. We’ve braved the belly of the beast, we’ve learned that quiet isn’t always peace and the norms and notions of what just is, isn’t always justice. And yet the dawn is ours before we knew it, somehow we do it, somehow we’ve weathered and witnessed a nation that isn’t broken but simply unfinished.

We, the successors of a country and a time where a skinny black girl descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president only to find herself reciting for one. And, yes, we are far from polished, far from pristine, but that doesn’t mean we are striving to form a union that is perfect, we are striving to forge a union with purpose, to compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters and conditions of man.

So we lift our gazes not to what stands between us, but what stands before us. We close the divide because we know to put our future first, we must first put our differences aside. We lay down our arms so we can reach out our arms to one another, we seek harm to none and harmony for all.

Let the globe, if nothing else, say this is true: that even as we grieved, we grew, even as we hurt, we hoped, that even as we tired, we tried, that we’ll forever be tied together victorious, not because we will never again know defeat but because we will never again sow division.

Scripture tells us to envision that everyone shall sit under their own vine and fig tree and no one should make them afraid. If we’re to live up to our own time, then victory won’t lie in the blade, but in in all of the bridges we’ve made.

That is the promise to glade, the hill we climb if only we dare it because being American is more than a pride we inherit, it’s the past we step into and how we repair it. We’ve seen a force that would shatter our nation rather than share it. That would destroy our country if it meant delaying democracy, and this effort very nearly succeeded. But while democracy can periodically be delayed, but it can never be permanently defeated.

In this truth, in this faith, we trust, for while we have our eyes on the future, history has its eyes on us, this is the era of just redemption we feared in its inception we did not feel prepared to be the heirs of such a terrifying hour but within it we found the power to author a new chapter, to offer hope and laughter to ourselves, so while once we asked how can we possibly prevail over catastrophe, now we assert how could catastrophe possibly prevail over us.

We will not march back to what was but move to what shall be, a country that is bruised but whole, benevolent but bold, fierce and free, we will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation because we know our inaction and inertia will be the inheritance of the next generation, our blunders become their burden. But one thing is certain: if we merge mercy with might and might with right, then love becomes our legacy and change our children’s birthright.

So let us leave behind a country better than the one we were left, with every breath from my bronze, pounded chest, we will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one, we will rise from the golden hills of the West, we will rise from the windswept Northeast where our forefathers first realized revolution, we will rise from the lake-rimmed cities of the Midwestern states, we will rise from the sunbaked South, we will rebuild, reconcile, and recover in every known nook of our nation in every corner called our country our people diverse and beautiful will emerge battered and beautiful, when the day comes we step out of the shade aflame and unafraid, the new dawn blooms as we free it, for there is always light if only we’re brave enough to see it, if only we’re brave enough to be it.